Next week is going to be busy: a class and a webinar!

Linkedin Centipedes at 2010 Bay to Breakers.

I have two things coming up next week and decided to share them here!

On Tuesday, I’ll teach a class on LinkedIn for business.

On Thursday, I’ll lead Lunch & Learn Teleseminar: Social Media 101 With Regina Walton – Sponsored by FCN & NAGC.

I’m just excited for both. Check them out!

Now I have to get some lesson and presentation planning in.

Photo courtesy of smi23le on Flickr.

Keeping Technology Simple: August 1, 2011

Photo courtesy of Choconancy, Nancy White, on Flickr.

I was the featured guest on Keeping Technology Simple yesterday. The subtitle for yesterday’s episode was “What’s Your Social Media Strategy?”.

It was fun because Jim Blue interviewed me before. It was good to touch base with someone who talked to me about social media when I was a brand new freelancer vs. now when I’m freelancer who is about two years in.

We talked about a few things. We talked about why I set up my business, what’s changed in the last year, what criteria I use to take on clients, how to learn about the social web and blogging. It’s a short interview, around 30 minutes.

Here it is, so take a listen: Keeping Technology Simple: What is Your Social Media Strategy?

Thanks.

Social Media IS NOT Magic

Photo courtesy of Hryck on Flickr

I’ve just found a lot of people who seem to think that social media is some mysterious and magical thing. That sentiment has inspired me to fire this blog back up.

As someone who works in this very fun field, I get that a lot. I get this will current clients. I get this with possible clients. I also just see it a lot in passing.

The social web is not magic. It’s something that humans have done forever: communicate. I just HATE seeing requests like this:

I am seeking someone who is an expert at this who can take my (whatever it is but redacted because this is a quote) and work your magic.

Look. It’s NOT magic, and, honestly, as much as I love the thought-leaders in this space, we’re all learning as we go. I’m not going to call any of them experts. This is all new and even the people who have expertise are learning and adapting to new tools and resources that are constantly being launched.

It takes knowledge of the tools. It takes knowing how to use them. It takes strategy. It takes trying, measuring, and adjusting, as needed. It takes reading case studies. It takes reading on what people are doing. I’ll also admit it takes sharing what you’re doing (and, yes, I’ve been neglecting that; building a business is HARD.)

However, most important is that a successful social media strategy takes also having GREAT products and/or GREAT content that helps people solve their problems or engages people on an emotional level.

(*Also, before someone wanders in to say people are just using “magic” and similar terms as a figure of speech or play on words and they understand that it takes knowledge and strategy, I’ll agree that maybe that’s the case, for some. However, a lot of people do seem to then there is some mysterious alchemy going on, and that’s not true.)

Social Media: New Year’s Eve Style

Well, at least they’re on it. However, there is no way on this Earth that you’ll catch me in Times Square this New Year’s Eve. It’s already insanely cold out there.  That’s the beauty of social media!

I don’t have to be there. 😉 If you will be there, bring your iPhone!

NewYearsEveWebcast.jpgThe Times Square Alliance and Countdown Entertainment aren’t dropping the ball when it comes to incorporating social media into the upcoming New Year’s Eve celebration, as they will offer a six-and-a-half-hour Webcast via TimesSquareNYC.org, Livestream.com/2010, or Facebook.com/TimesSquareNYC, as well as on a special site for iPhone users, The New York TimesGadgetwise reports.

The Webcast will follow five separate story lines and cover the international participants, the history of Times Square through photos, the story behind the bloggers and other information, and viewers will be able to post photos and comment via Twitter and Facebook, according to Gadgetwise.

Repost: How to Engage your Facebook Fans

It’s been over a month. I know! Over a month.

My apologies, but I’ve been busy working, and that’s an excellent reason to be busy 😉

Part of the work I do is social media management, I thought this was an interesting enough presentation to share. There are a few small grammatical errors in it, but the basics of what they’re discussing is good enough to overlook the small kinks.

Check it out:

IBM Study: The end of advertising as we know it

This is a great study on where advertising is going.

It’s not my work. I’m just helping spread the news.

So, again, a partial quote with a link over to the original post.

Enjoy!

IBM Study: The end of advertising as we know it

madmen1

The next 5 years will hold more change for the advertising industry than the previous 50 did.

The information for this post is from an IBM global surveys of more than 2,400 consumers and 80 advertising experts … the report is titled, The end of advertising as we know it.”

Imagine an advertising world where ... spending on interactive, one-to-one advertising formats surpasses traditional, one-to-many advertising vehicles, and a significant share of ad space is sold through auctions and exchanges. Advertisers know who viewed and acted on an ad, and pay based on real impact rather than estimated “impressions.” Consumers self-select which ads they watch and share preferred ads with peers. User-generated advertising is as prevalent (and appealing) as agency-created spots.

As bait for you to click over, IBM has a report and you can download it from the Social Media Today page.

So get to clicking!

Twitter Makes You Dumb

I’m still up and still reading.  I couldn’t let this headline pass, “Twitter Makes You Dumb”.

Um, okay…I’m just going to say that, at best, this has to be a preliminary study.

Why?  Because this same article talks about other ways to keep your neurons firing like suduko, which I play all the time on the subway (new city, still learning and therefore I’ll play a game or listen to a podcast instead of loud music.) I would agree that if anyone spent most of their day thinking in 140 character increments and communicating in Twitter short-hand, they’re in trouble.

However, for me, Twitter connects me to a larger world.  Frequently, I’m linked to interesting articles or blogs that have a lot of content and interesting ideas.  Either there has to be more to the study for me to take it seriously or they need to dig deeper into this conclusion because it’s going to differ depending on how someone uses Twitter.

Twitter makes you dumb, says psychologist

Guildford, England – Facebook users can boost their intelligence, while microbloggers are tweeting their brain cells away, says a Scottish scientist.

Spending time on Facebook can boost what Dr Tracy Alloway of the University of Stirling calls ‘working memory’, while using Twitter or watching videos on YouTube requires little use of memory skills and can have a negative effect on intelligence.

Playing video war games and solving Sudoku puzzles can also stimulate memory skills, says Alloway, who claims working memory is more important to success and happiness than IQ. In an eight week study of children aged between 11 and 14, the performance of slow learners saw a significant improvement in literacy and numeracy skills and IQ ratings when their working memory was stimulated.

Just feel those braincells dying

”It was a massive effect,” said Alloway, at the British Science Festival at the University of Surrey in Guildford. ”On Twitter you receive an endless stream of information, but it’s also very succinct. You don’t have to process that information and your attention span is being reduced and you’re not engaging your brain and improving nerve connections.”

War games make people use their working memory and keep track of past actions and plan future moves, she claimed, adding that there was evidence linking watching large amounts of TV with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and extensive texting with lower IQ scores.

Sudoku was also good exercise for memory skills, as was keeping track of friends on Facebook, but the instant nature of texting, Tweeting or watching YouTube was not good for stimulating working memory.

What do you think?

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